Peasant life in the middle ages essay

The Domesday Book When we enjoy entertainment or festivals that celebrate medieval life and times, it is the life of royalty, traveling bards, monks of knights that are most often the focus of our attention. Few of us would want to celebrate the lives of peasants and surfs during the middle ages. There is good reason for that. There was little to celebrate about the harsh life poor people endured during this time in history.

Peasant life in the middle ages essay

Female artisans in some cities were, like their male equivalents, organized in guilds. Christine de Pizan was a noted late medieval writer on women's issues.

Her Book of the City of Ladies attacked misogynywhile her The Treasure of the City of Ladies articulated an ideal of feminine virtue for women from walks of life ranging from princess to peasant's wife.

She will ponder long and hard whether she can do something always preserving the honour of her husband to prevent this war.

According to canon lawthe law of the Catholic Churchmarriage was a concrete exclusive bond between husband and wife; giving the husband all power and control in the relationship.

McDougall concurs with Charles Reid's argument that both men and women shared rights in regards to sex and marriage; which includes: Marriage could be proclaimed in secret by the mutually consenting couple, or arranged between families as long as the man and woman were not forced and consented freely; but by the 12th century in western canon law, consent whether in mutual secrecy or in a public sphere between the couple was imperative.

Marriage also allowed for the couples' social networks to expand. This was according to Bennett who investigated the marriage of Henry Kroyl Jr. Due to the couples' fathers, Henry Kroyl Sr. Bennett details how Kroyl Jr.

Agnes' connections expanded also based on Kroyl Jr. However, Bennett also signifies that a familial alliance between the couples' families of origin did not form. Agnes, though all contact with her family did not cease, her social network expanded to her husband's family of origin and his new connections.

Widowhood and remarriage[ edit ] Upon the death of a spouse, widows could gain power in inheriting their husbands' property as opposed to adult sons.

Male-preference primogeniture stipulated that the male heir was to inherit their deceased father's land; and in cases of no sons, the eldest daughter would inherit property. However, widows could inherit property when they had minor sons, or if provisions were made for them to inherit.

Peasant life in the middle ages essay

Through court rolls, he found that many widows in this area independently held land successfully. He argued that some widows may have remarried due to keeping up with their tenure and financial difficulties of holding their inherited land, or community pressures for the said widow to remarry if she had a male servant living in her home.

Remarriage would put the widow back under the thumb and control of her new husband.

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Even young widows, who would have had an easier time remarrying, remained independent and unmarried. Franklin considers the lives of widows to have been "liberating" because women had more autonomous control over their lives and property; they were able to "argu[e] their own cases in court, hir[e] labour, and cultivat[e] and manag[e] holdings successfully".

Remarriage would have affected inheritance of property, especially if the widow had children with her second husband; however there are several cases where sons from the widow's first marriage were able to inherit before the second husband.

Marxist historian Chris Middleton indicated that this type of patriarchal control was assumed. Ideally, women were to fall under male control regardless of class. English peasant women generally could not hold lands for long, rarely learnt any craft occupation and rarely advanced past the position of assistants, and could not become officials.Peasant Life in the Middle Ages Essay - The Peasants life journey, through the Middle Ages was tough.

The life of a peasant was hard and not easy or respected. A peasant’s work was never appreciated by the high social classes. Peasant life should be acknowledged for the work and impact it . Daily Life of a Peasant in the Middle Ages The daily life of a peasant in the Middle ages was hard.

Medieval Serfs had to labor on the lord's land for two or three days each week, and at specially busy seasons, such as ploughing and harvesting. Birth and infancy were the most dangerous stages of life for people in the Middle Ages.

Records from the time period suggest that approximately 20% of women died during childbirth and 5% of infants died during delivery with another % dying in their first month/5(1). Life of Peasants in Medieval Times.

Written by Tim Nash History - Middle Ages Related Articles.

Peasant life in the middle ages essay

The Bayeux Tapestry Few of us would want to celebrate the lives of peasants and surfs during the middle ages. Furniture was a luxury for a peasant family so life took place on the floor.

Birth and infancy were the most dangerous stages of life for people in the Middle Ages. Records from the time period suggest that approximately 20% of women died during childbirth and 5% of infants died during delivery with another % dying in their first month.4/4(1). This peasant did not know how to write.

Just kidding! My work starts on the next page Writing Assignment: Peasant Life Jacob Joyce 10/28/ Dear Journal, 10/28/ Today the Baro.

Medieval History: Peasants Life - Essay